Tag Archives: Hepatica

Elsie Holmes Nature Park near Ringgold, Georgia

Rainy days… Tired of them. Sunday, 3/15/2015, promised to be beautiful, and it delivered. During the week I got an email from someone mentioning seeing some spring wildflowers at Elsie Holmes Nature Park near Ringgold, Georgia (Thanks, Jane!). I had heard of this park before, and had it on my “someday” list, so my wife and I decided to head over there after lunch with some grandkids at Clyde’s on Main. Great place! (Both Clyde’s and Elsie Holmes Park.)

Hepatica nobilis bloom near South Chickamauga Creek

Hepatica bloom on the descent to South Chickamauga Creek

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket at Pigeon Mountain Status Update 3/07/2015 – It’s Picking Up, Just a Little…

Today (3/07/15) was one of the rare days so far this year – mostly clear skies and warmer weather – into the 60’s. That made for a great day to get down to The Pocket for a status update. There’s not a lot of change concerning which species are blooming (with an exception) – but those that have been blooming are picking up the pace a lot. The one new species I found blooming – Carolina Spring Beauty; a single plant along the trail to the falls.

Carolina Spring Beauty, Wide-leaved Spring Beauty - Claytonia caroliniana

Carolina Spring Beauty – Claytonia caroliniana

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket at Pigeon Mountain 02/11/2015 – It’s Stirring…

Today (2/11) was sunny and unseasonally warm (62 degrees by late afternoon) for February, but much colder weather is forecast – tomorrow topping out in the 30s. Since we’ve been out of town for several days, I figured I should take this opportunity to check to see if the wildflowers are starting to show up at The Pocket. I was expecting to see Harbinger-of-Spring and that other harbinger of spring, Hepatica blooming, and kind of expected to see some Toothwort blooming. Well, 2 out of 3 ain’t bad.

Harbinger-of-Spring - Erigenia bulbosa

Harbinger-of-Spring – Erigenia bulbosa

For the rest of the story…

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

#Waterfalls and #Wildflowers – Walls of Jericho

A little over a year ago a good friend (my wife said I should use BFF here, but I’ll pass…) invited me to visit a place I’d not heard of before – Walls of Jericho astraddle the Alabama / Tennesse border.  I wasn’t able to join him last year, but we made the trip together this year on Tuesday, April 1.  It’s advertised as a “strenuous” hike, and it lived up to that billing – there is about 1,000 of elevation drop in less about 2 miles out of the Alabama trailhead (meaning “increase” on the way back out) – but it was well worth the effort.

End of the Trail at Walls of Jericho

End of the Trail at Walls of Jericho

Read on…

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket at Pigeon Mountain Status Update 3/27/2014

Yesterday (3/27) was one of the rare days this spring – mostly clear skies and warmer weather – into the 60’s. As a plus a couple of my grandkids wanted to join me, so a great time at The Pocket was guaranteed.  Several of the “signature species” at The Pocket – Virginia Bluebell, Wood (Celandine) Poppy, Dutchman’s Breeches (or, as my grandson called them, “Upside Down Pants from Holland), Trout Lily are blooming right now.  I’m developing a checklist to use so I won’t have to photograph or remember what all is blooming, and of the 51 species on my current version of the checklist, 25 are blooming right now.

Trailing Trillium (Trillium decumbens)

Trailing Trillium – Trillium decumbens

For the rest of the story…

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket at Pigeon Mountain Status Update 3/18/2014

While the weather is keeping things slow, things are picking up at The Pocket.  Several species have started blooming, and even more are “almost there.”  Checking last year’s reports, we’re tracking pretty close to 3/10/2013.  The big excitement for me today was finding that a few Dutchman’s Breeches have started blooming.

Dutchman's Breeches - Dicentra cucullaria

Dutchman’s Breeches – Dicentra cucullaria

Read on for a more complete update…

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket at Pigeon Mountain Status Update 3/10/2014

Maybe I shouldn’t be surprised considering the cold weather we had in January and February, but I do continue to be surprised about how late the wildflowers are starting at The Pocket.  Even so, today’s trip was a good one – not only because it was a beautiful day, but also because what is blooming is beautiful.  The biggest “news” is that Bloodroot is now starting to bloom.

 - Sanguinaria canadensis

While there were only a few Bloodroot blooming along the boardwalk, there were hundreds up the Pocket Loop Trail.

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

The Pocket Status Update 2/24/2014

Eight warm days after my last trip by The Pocket I expected more.  I thought I’d see Harbinger of Spring, Hepatica, and Toothwort blooming, and possibly a few other early bloomers – maybe some Chickweed and Spring Beauties.  Well, I guess as far as expectations are concerned two out of three ain’t bad, as the saying goes.  Harbinger of Spring and Hepatica were all that was blooming; very similar to Feb 4 last year, so it looks like we’re nearly 3 weeks behind last year’s early bloom.  I did get to spend some quality time with a few Hepatica.  Start planning your trip to The Pocket – remember it is now a fee area.

Anemone acutiloba

Numerous Hepatica – Anemone acutiloba – were blooming.

Check out what else I saw:

Continue reading

Post to Twitter

#Waterfalls and #Wildflowers – Virgin Falls State Natural Area

We usually just call it “Virgin Falls”, both to refer to the 1,551 acre plot of land, as well as the namesake waterfalls occupying the far end of it. The official name for the land, however, is ”Virgin Falls State Natural Area” at least since the state of Tennessee acquired it in 2012. When I visited it previously it was known as “Virgin Falls Pocket Wilderness” and was owned by the Bowater Southern Paper Corporation. Bowater owns and maintains a number of “Pocket Wilderness” areas, and admirable public benefit and, I’m sure, public relations activity. Tennessee acquired the land using a number of funding sources, including a grant from the federal Endangered Species Recovery Land Acquisition Fund. These funds were provided in part due to the presence of Virginia Spirea (Spiraea virginiana), one of the rarest shrubs in North America.

When I heard about Virginia Spirea being in the Virgin Falls area I decided I needed to add that to the USWildflowers Waterfalls and Wildflowers series, and I was fortunate to make an overnight hike into the Virgin Falls State Natural Area on March 8-9 of this year. While many wildflowers were already in full swing down my way in north Georgia, 70 miles north and a bit of elevation gain makes a difference, and this will be more waterfalls and less wildflowers than I expected to report.

Cascade on Big Laurel Creek

Cascade on Big Laurel Creek

Continue reading

Post to Twitter