Monthly Archives: September 2011

False Pennyroyal – Isanthus brachiatus – Added to USWildflowers Database

False Pennyroyal, a native species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/26/2011.) Scientific name is Isanthus brachiatus.  It is also known by the common name Fluxweed.  Photo below was taken in Walker County, Ga on September 24, 2011.   Go to the False Pennyroyal detail page for more photos and information.

False Pennyroyal, Fluxweed - Isanthus brachiatus

False Pennyroyal, Fluxweed - Isanthus brachiatus

Jimsonweed – Datura stramonium – Added to USWildflowers Database

Jimsonweed, an introduced species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/25/2011.) Scientific name is Datura stramonium. It is also known by the common names Jamestown Weed, Mad Apple, Moon Flower, Stinkwort, Thorn Apple, and Devil’s Trumpet.  Photo below was taken in the Pigeon Mountain Wildlife Management Area in Walker County, GA on Sep 24, 2011.   Go to the Jimsonweed detail page for more photos and information.

Jimsonweed, Jamestown Weed, Mad Apple, Moon Flower, Stinkwort, Thorn Apple, Devil's Trumpet - Datura stramonium

Jimsonweed, Jamestown Weed, Mad Apple, Moon Flower, Stinkwort, Thorn Apple, Devil’s Trumpet – Datura stramonium

Ten-Petal Sunflower – Helianthus decapetalus – Added to USWildflowers Database

Ten-petal Sunflower, a native species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/23/2011.) Scientific name is Helianthus decapetalus.  It is also known by the common names Thinleaf Sunflower, Forest Sunflower,  and Pale Sunflower .  Photo below was taken in Grundy County, TN on September 17, 2011.   Go to the Ten-petal Sunflower detail page for more photos and information.

Thinleaf Sunflower, Ten-petal Sunflower, Forest Sunflower, Pale Sunflower - Helianthus decapetalus

Thinleaf Sunflower, Ten-petal Sunflower, Forest Sunflower, Pale Sunflower - Helianthus decapetalus

#NPOD: Bursting Hearts #NativePlants

Native Plant of the Day 09/21/2011

Photo from Aug 28, 2010. Location: Reflection Riding, Hamilton County, TN

Bursting Hearts unopened seedpod – for more photos / information go to the Euonymus americanus detail page.

Bursting Heart, Hearts-a-bustin', Strawberry Bush. - Euonymus americanus

Bursting Heart, Hearts-a-bustin’, Strawberry Bush. – Euonymus americanus

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Small Camas – Camassia quamash – Added to USWildflowers Database

Small Camas, a native species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/05/2011.) Scientific name is Camassia quamash.  It is also known by the common name Quamash.  Photo below was taken in Custer County, Idaho on June 13, 2010.   Go to the Small Camas Detail Page for more photos and information.

Small Camas, Quamash - Camassia quamash

Small Camas, Quamash - Camassia quamash

Yellow Fringed Orchid – Platanthera ciliaris – Added to USWildflowers Database

Yellow Fringed Orchid, a native species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/05/2011.) Scientific name is Platanthera ciliaris.  It is also known by the common name Orange Fringed Orchid.  Photo below was taken along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Waynesville, NC on Aug 1, 2011.   Go to the Yellow Fringed Orchid Detail Page for more photos and information.

Yellow Fringed Orchid, Orange Fringed Orchid - Platanthera ciliaris

Yellow Fringed Orchid, Orange Fringed Orchid - Platanthera ciliaris

Common Ragweed – Ambrosia artemisiifolia – Added to USWildflowers Database

Fly Poison, a native species, has been added to the USWildflowers database (09/05/2011.) Scientific name is Ambrosia artemisiifolia.  It is also known by the common names Annual Ragweed, Small Ragweed, and Roman Wormwood.  Photo below was taken in Walker County, Georgia on Sep 4, 2011.   Go to the Common Ragweed Detail Page for more photos and information.

Common Ragweed, Annual Ragweed, Small Ragweed, Roman Wormwood - Ambrosia artemisiifolia

Common Ragweed, Annual Ragweed, Small Ragweed, Roman Wormwood - Ambrosia artemisiifolia

Driest Month Ever – Blue Mistflower Thrives

It’s official – August was the driest month on record – ever – in the Chattanooga area.  The grass is brown, and plants everywhere are drooping with the stress of the drought, and we appear to have lost some of the plants we’ve purchased over the past couple of years – a Rhododendron and our Teaberry plant.  However, the Blue Mistflower that show up around our property seem to be thriving in spite of the lack of rain, and some of the insects on them seem pretty healthy, too.

Blue Mistflower - Conoclinium coelestinum

Blue Mistflower - Conoclinium coelestinum

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